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The Southern North Sea

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This is where I spent most of the first half of my working life and saw a lot more birds offshore than I do now. This is partly due to to the fact that surveyors used to have less equipment and were often situated on the bridge - and thus commanding a rather better view of the outside world than from deep in the bowels of the ship.

Citrine Wagtail off NE Scotland, 07 September 2011
Citine Wagtail off NE Scotland, 07 September 2011
The proportion of rarities to common migrants is much higher on offshore installations compared to the mainland - just like the famous rarity islands.



Blackbird offshore

Migrating Blackbird on the back deck of a vessel working near Sleipner B, March 2009

Spotted Flycatcher, Danish Sector, May 2016

Spotted Flycatcher, Danish Sector, May 2016

The above trip also functioned as a trial of the Canon Powershot superzoom camera





 Reed Warbler

Reed Warbler

The photographs below illustrate some of the difficulties encountered trying to see birds offshore; there is almost invariably plenty of equipment to hide amongst - and the observer is often limited in the choice of observation point.


Skylark by night
Skylark by night

Song Thrush
Song Thrush

Woodpigeon
Woodpigeon

Ringed Brambling, Brent Field, April 2007
A Brambling resting briefly on a lifeboat, Brent Field, April 2007
Note the ring on its left leg.






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